Awards

SIGIR presents three awards. The Gerard Salton Award is presented every three years to an individual who has made “… significant, sustained and continuing contributions to research in information retrieval”. The Best Paper Award is presented to the individual(s) judged by a separate awards committee to have written the best paper appearing in the annual conference proceedings. The Best Student Paper is presented to the author of the best paper written solely or primarily by a student.

SIGIR also co-sponsors (with SIGWEB) the Vannevar Bush award, for the best paper at the JCDL conference.

Gerard Salton Award

This award honors those who have made “… significant, sustained and continuing contributions to research in information retrieval”.

Year Honoree Presentation Lecture
2012 Norbert Fuhr
Norbert Fuhr
“Information Retrieval as Engineering Science”
“For pioneering, sustained, and continuing contributions to the theoretical foundations of information retrieval and database systems. His work describing how learning methods can be used with retrieval models and indexing anticipated the current interest in learning ranking functions, his development of probabilistic retrieval models for database systems and XML was ground-breaking, and his recent work on retrieval models for interactive retrieval has inspired new research. His rigorous approach to research and research methods is an outstanding example for our field.”
2009 Susan Dumais
Susan Dumais
“An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Information Retrieval”
“For nearly thirty years of significant, sustained, and continuing contributions to research, for exceptional mentorship, and for leadership in bridging the fields of information retrieval and human computer interaction. Her contributions to both the theoretical development and practical implementations of Latent Semantic Indexing, question-answering, desktop search, combining search and navigation, and incorporating the user and their context, have all substantially advanced and enriched the field of Information Retrieval.”
2006 C.J. “Keith” van Rijsbergen
Keith van Rijsbergen
“Quantum haystacks”
“This acceptance talk is a curious mixture of personal history and developing ideas in the context of the growing field of IR covering several decades. I want to concentrate on models and theories, interpreted loosely, and try and give an insight into where I have got to in my thinking, where the ideas came from, and where I believe we are going. In the last few years I have been working on the development of what might be coined as a design language for IR. It takes its inspiration from Quantum Mechanics, but by analogy only. The mathematical objects represent documents; these objects might be vectors (or density operators) in an n-dimensional vector space (usually a Hilbert space).”
2003 W. Bruce Croft
Bruce Croft
“Information Retrieval and Computer Science: An Evolving Relationship”
For… “More than twenty years of significant, sustained and continuing contributions to research in information retrieval. His contributions to the theoretical development and practical use of Bayesian inference networks and language modelling for retrieval, and to their evaluation through extensive experiment and application, are particularly important. The Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval which he founded illustrates the strong synergies between fundamental research and its application to a wide range of practical information management problems.”
2000 Stephen Robertson
Stephen Robertson
“On theoretical argument in information retrieval”
SIGIR Forum, 34 (1), 1-10 (April 2000)
For… “Thirty years of significant, sustained and continuing contributions to research in information retrieval. Of special importance are the theoretical and empirical contributions to the development, refinement, and evaluation of probabilistic models of information retrieval.”
1997 Tefko Saracevic
Tefko Saracevic
“Users lost (summary): reflections on the past, future, and limits of information science”
SIGIR Forum, 31 (2), 16-27 (Fall 1997).
The first part contains personal reflections of the author related to the major events and issues that formed his professional life and research agenda. The second, and major part, considers the broad aspects of information science as a field: origin, problems addressed, areas of study, structure, specialties, paradigm splits, and education problems. The third part discusses the limits of information science in terms of internal limits imposed by the activities in the field and external limits imposed by the very human nature of information processing and use. Throughout, issues related to users and use are transposed, as being of primary concern.
1994 William Cooper
William Cooper
“The formalism of probability theory in IR: a foundation or an encumbrance?”
Probabilistic theories of retrieval bring to bear on the information search problem a high degree of theoretical coherence and deductive power. In principle, this power ought to be an invaluable asset. In practice, it has turned out to be a mixed blessing. The question considered here is whether the trappings of the probabilistic formalism strengthen or encumber IR research on balance.
1991 Cyril Cleverdon
(1914-1997)
Cyril Cleverdon
“The significance of the Cranfield tests on index languages”
See also Journal of Documentation 54(3), June 1998, 265-280.
1988 Karen Spärck Jones
(1935-2007)
Karen Spark Jones
“A look back and a look forward”
This paper is in two parts, following the suggestion that I first comment on my own past experience in information retrieval, and then present my views on the present and future.
1983 Gerard Salton
(1927-1995)
Gerald Salton
“About the future of automatic information retrieval”
See also SIGIR Forum 31(1) Salton memorial issue.

SIGIR Best Paper Award

The Best Paper Award is presented to the individual(s) judged by an awards committee to have written the best paper appearing in the annual conference proceedings.

Year Authors Citation
2014 Giuseppe Ottaviano
Rossano Venturini
Partitioned Elias-Fano indexes
For a paper that significantly improves on an already excellent compression technique, while preserving query time efficiency, as well as exhibiting the best compression ratio/processing speed trade-off.
2013 Ryen W. White Beliefs and Biases in Web Search
For a paper which explores the impact of pre-conceived biases when searching in the health domain using a combination of surveys, human labeling of search results, and large scale search log analysis.
2012 Mark Smucker
Charles Clarke
Time-based calibration of effectiveness measures
Selected for proposing a novel evaluation framework for IR where cumulative gain is computed with consideration of the time spent by users on examining search results, which enables better modeling of user effort in quantitative IR evaluation.
2011 Mikhail Ageev
Qi Guo
Dmitry Lagun
Eugene Agichtein
Find It If You Can: A Game for Modeling Different Types of Web Search Success Using Interaction Data
2010 Ryen W. White
Jeff Huang
Assessing the Scenic Route: Measuring the Value of Search Trails in Web Logs
2009 Jaime Arguello
Fernando Diaz
Jamie Callan
Jean-Francois Crespo
Sources of evidence for vertical selection
2008 Jeremy Pickens
Gene Golovchinsky
Chirag Shah
Pernilla Qvarfordt
Maribeth Back
Algorithmic Mediation for Collaborative Exploratory Search
2007 Ryen White
Mikhail Bilenko
Silviu Cucerzan
Studying the Use of Popular Destinations to Enhance Web Search Interaction
2006 Ben Carterette
James Allan
Ramesh Sitaraman
Minimal Test Collections for Retrieval Evaluation
2005 Elad Yom-Tov
Shai Fine
David Carmel
Adam Darlow
Learning to Estimate Query Difficulty (Including Applications to Missing Content Detection and Distributed Information Retrieval)
2004 Hui Fang
Tao Tao
ChengXiang Zhai
A Formal Study of Information Retrieval Heuristics
2003 Ian Ruthven Re-examining the potential effectiveness of interactive query expansion
2002 Yi Zhang
Jamie Callan
Thomas Minka
Novelty and redundancy detection in adaptive filtering
2001 James Allan
Rahul Gupta
Vikas Khandelwal
Temporal Summaries of News Topics
2000 Kalervo Järvelin
Jaana Kekäläinen
IR evaluation methods for retrieving highly relevant documents.
1999 Jian-Yun Nie
Michel Simard
Pierre Isabelle
Richard Durand
Cross-language information retrieval based on automatic mining of parallel texts from the web
1998 Warren Greiff A theory of term weighting based on exploratory data analysis
1997 H.T. Ng
W.B. Goh
K.L. Low
Feature selection, perceptron learning, and a usability case study for text categorization
1996 G.J.F. Jones
J.T. Foote
Karen Spärck Jones
S.J. Young
Retrieving spoken documents by combining multiple index sources

SIGIR Best Student Paper Award

The Best Student Paper is presented to the author of the best paper written solely or primarily by a student.

Year Authors Citation
2014 Dmitry Lagun
Chih-Hung Hsieh
Dale Webster
Vidhya Navalpakkam
Towards better measurement of attention and satisfaction in mobile search
For a paper that addresses the problem of no clicks in answer-like mobile search, demonstrating viewport, measurable at large-scale, as a strong and reliable signal of the quality of a search result, through carefully designed experimentation.
2013 Karthik Raman
Paul N. Bennett
Kevyn Collins-Thompson
Toward Whole-Session Relevance: Exploring Intrinsic Diversity in Web Search
For a paper that addresses the role that search has within a user’s whole information-seeking session, identifying signals in a user’s search session which can help to promote diversity in the results of web search.
2012 Shuzi Niu
Jiafeng Guo
Yanyan Lan
Xueqi Cheng
Top-k learning to rank: labeling, ranking and evaluation
Selected for proposing a novel top-k labeling strategy for efficiently obtaining labeled data for learning to rank in information retrieval and proposing a novel learning to rank method to effectively learn from such a new form of relevance judgments.
2011 Shuang-Hong Yang
Bo Long
Alexander J. Smola
Hongyuan Zha
Zhaohui Zheng
Collaborative Competitive Filtering: Learning Recommender using Context of User Choice
2010 Ioannis Arapakis (student)
Konstantinos Athanasakos
Joemon M. Jose
A Comparison of General vs. Personalized Affective Models for the Prediction of Topical Relevance
2009 Jaime Arguello (student)
Fernando Diaz
Jamie Callan
Jean-Francois Crespo
Sources of evidence for vertical selection
2008 Yuting Liu
Bin Gao
Tie-Yan Liu
Ying Zhang
Zhiming Ma
Shuyuan He
Hang Li
BrowseRank: Letting Web Users Vote for Page Importance
2007 D. Sculley (student)
Gabriel Wachman (student)
Relaxed online Support Vector Machines for spam filtering
2006 Ben Carterette (student)
James Allan
Ramesh Sitaraman
Minimal Test Collections for Retrieval Evaluation
2005 Donald Metzler (student)
Bruce Croft
A Markov random field model for term dependencies
2004 Hui Fang
Tao Tao
ChengXiang Zhai
A Formal Study of Information Retrieval Heuristics
2003 Stefanie Tellex (student)
Boris Katz
Jimmy Lin
Aaron Fernandes
Gregory Marton
Quantitative evaluation of passage retrieval algorithms for question answering
2002 Yi Zhang (student)
Jamie Callan
Thomas Minka
Novelty and redundancy detection in adaptive filtering
2001 Adnike Lam-Adesina (student)
Gareth Jones
Applying Summarization Techniques for Term Selection in Relevance Feedback
2000 Ilmerio Reis da Silva (student)
Berthier Ribeiro-Neto
Pavel Calado (student)
Edleno Moura
Nivio Ziviani
Link-based and content-based evidential information in a belief network model.
1999 Owen de Kretser
Alistair Moffat
Efficient document presentation with a locality-based similarity heuristic
1998 Martin Wechsler
Eugen Munteanu
Peter Schaeuble
New techniques for open-vocabulary spoken document retrieval
1997 Lisa Ballesteros
Bruce Croft
Phrasal translation and query expansion techniques for cross-language information retrieval
1996 Amit Singhal
Chris Buckley
Mandar Mitra
Pivoted length document normalization
1995
co-winners
Hinrich Schuetze
Jan Pedersen
David Hull
A comparison of classifiers and document representations for the routing problem.
Eric
Brown>
Fast evaluation of structured queries for information retrieval.

SIGIR Best Poster Award

Year Authors Citation
1999 Michael Witbrock
Vibhu Mittal
Ultra-summarization: A statistical approach to generating highly condensed non-extractive summaries
1998 Ming-Jer Lee
Lee-Feng Chien
Automatic acquisition of phrasal knowledge for English-Chinese bilingual information retrieval
1997 K. Ng
V. Zue
An investigation of subword unit representations for spoken document retrieval

SIGIR Doctoral Consortium Award

Year Author Citation
2007* Krisztian Balog People search in the enterprise
Georg Buscher Attention-based information retrieval
2006 Jun Wang Probabilistic Relevance Models for Collaborative Filtering
2005 Paul McNamee Advancing Corpus-Based Bilingual Retrieval
2004* Jochen Leidner Toponym Resolution in Text: “Which Sheffield is it?”
Paul Ogilvie Understanding combination of evidence using generative probabilistic models for information retrieval

* co-winners

Vannevar Bush Best Paper Award

Best paper at the JCDL conference (more information)

Year Authors Citation
2011 Robert Sanderson
Benjamin Albritton
Rafael Schwemmer
Herbert Van De Sompel
SharedCanvas: A Collaborative Model for Medieval Manuscript Layout Dissemination
2010 David Bamman
Alison Babeu
Gregory Crane
Transferring structural markup across translations using multilingual alignment and projection
2009 Steven Bethard
Philipp Wetzler
Kirsten Butcher
James H. Martin
Tamara Sumner
Automatically characterizing resource quality for educational digital libraries
2008 Catherine C. Marshall From writing and analysis to the repository: taking the scholars’ perspective on scholarly archiving
2007 Shane Ahern
Mor Naaman
Rahul Nair
Jeannie Yang
World explorer: visualizing aggregate data from unstructured text in geo-referenced collections
2006 Carl Lagoze
Tim cornwell
Naomi Dushay
Dean Ecktrom
Dean Krafft
John Saylor
Metadata aggregation and “automated digital libraries”: a retrospective on the NSDL experience
2005 Gordon W. Paynter Developing practical automatic metadata assignment and evaluation tools for internet resources
2004 Mor Naaman
Yee Jiun Song
Andreas Paepcke
Hector Garcia-Molina
Measuring the user’s experience with digital libraries
2003 Barbara M. Wildemuth
Gary Marchionini
Meng Yang
Gary Geisler
Todd Wilkens
Anthony Hughes
Richard Gruss
How fast is too fast?: evaluating fast forward surrogates for digital video
2002 Donna Bergmark Collection Systhesis
2001 Gregory Crane
Clifford E. Wulfman
David A. Smith
Building a Hypertextual Digital Library in the Humanities: A Case Study on London
2000 Joanna L. Wolfe Effects of annotations on student readers and writers
1999 David Bainbridge
Craig G. Nevill-Manning
Ian H. Witten
Towards a digital library of popular music
1998 Catherine C. Marshall Making metadata: a study of metadata creation for a mixed physical-digital collection